Plastic-Free July

Plastic Free July is a campaign to get people to sign up to a pledge to use less plastic (especially single-use plastic) for July (and hopefully longer).  The website includes lots of resources and ideas of how to reduce plastic use.

 

Apart from committing to using less plastic, we are suggesting that for PF July, 2G3S supporters might also like to help raise awareness of the campaign, and share some ideas for reducing plastic use, by hanging “labels” around our villages. The labels could include pictures with messages and signposts to Plastic Free July resources.  The aim is to take inspiration from ‘Craftivism’ to raise awareness in a passive, non-aggressive way.

 

Towards the end of June, we’ll make labels to hang on, for example, trees in the front garden, our gateposts, nearby benches, lampposts, railings, public places, etc etc  – the more the merrier.  We want them to catch people’s eye and get them to stop and look, and be inspired to find out more.

 

To start you off, here  and here are some examples of pictures and captions for your labels (the first are photos, the second are whale drawings).  At its simplest, you can print them off, cut up and stick the back of a picture to the back of a caption, and then hang them up in a place of your choosing.  Or if you or your family have an artistic bent, feel free to apply your craft skills to colour in, write beautifully/stencil on luggage labels or card, draw pictures, or even embroider messages if you want to – but please don’t use any plastic!

 

Please take photos of your labels and where you’ve hung them, put on social media if you use it, and send your pictures to 2G3S.  We will put them on local social media and our website, and in local magazines, and perhaps send them to our MP to increase the reach of the messages.

 

At the end of July please take your labels down!  We can’t be seen to be adding to the litter problem.  If in the meantime you notice your labels getting tatty/falling off, it would be great if you could refresh them.

 

There are also email signatures, social media logos etc on the PF July website if you would like to use them.

 

Thank you

 

Helen and Claire

Local elections May 6 2021

2G3S decided to put some questions on green issues to the candidates for the Sawston and Shelford County Council division and for Mayor of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Combined Authority.

 

You can see the responses we received in our newsletter extra here.  Spoiler alert: we received responses from all of the county council candidates we were able to contact (all bar one) and none of the mayoral candidates.

 

Please remember to vote on May 6th.

Computer recycling – take by Friday 16 April

A message from Mike Nettleton in Great Shelford:

We’ve arranged for unwanted computer hardware (PCs, laptops, printers, monitors, etc.) to be collected for recycling on 16 April.  This will be the last collection for a few months. We can also now take mobile phones again. Recycling is done by Recycle-Computers (http://recycle-computers.co.uk/), based in Watford. They refurbish PCs, monitors, printers, etc. and then give the hardware to schools, charities, etc. which don’t need/can’t afford new equipment. Anything which can’t be used is WEEE recycled. They have been recycling in the area since the early 2000s, initially as a result of an initiative by the former vicar of Great Shelford, Mike Goater.  Please dig out any computer hardware that you no longer need and/or is broken and either drop it round to me or give me a ring. In March we filled a Transit van with old hardware. No photos this time – we were all totally knackered from loading it!

Just as a reminder – we also recycle printer cartridges and mobile phones. Where they have economic value, they are recycled through Recycle4Charity, who then make a contribution to Tommy’s (the premature birth charity): http://www.tommys.org Where the cartridges have no economic value, they are recycled through the manufacturers own recycling scheme. Again, please just drop any old cartridges round.

Since the start of the year we’ve had a major push (with the Great Shelford Parochial Charities and COVID support group) to provide laptops to children for home schooling. We’ve had over 110 laptops donated; over 20 of those have been usable and have been donated to local schools and individual children. Those which are too old, broken or whatever will be properly recycled, so nothing goes to landfill. Every machine (whether usable or not) has been wiped and those which are usable have been upgraded to the latest version of Windows and had office and video/music software installed at no cost to the schools or individual children.

Thanks to everyone for your support with this.

 Mike Nettleton
E ku.oc1620743376.sisy1620743376lanae1620743376lgae@1620743376notel1620743376tten.1620743376ekim1620743376
T 01223 721366
M 07905 356468
F 0870 161 9450
W www.eagleanalysis.co.uk

From 2G3S: if anyone feels they could help with collecting or storing items, please get in touch with us at greengroupssss

Talk on Cambridge Nature Network – report

On 11 March 2021 James Littlewood, CEO of Cambridge Past Present and Future (CPPF), gave us an illustrated talk about the Cambridge Nature Network.

To reverse the local decline in biodiversity, our nature sites need to be better, bigger and more connected.  One way to achieve this is through a local nature recovery network, and one is being proposed for Cambridge.

The Cambridge Nature Network is based on six priority areas for recovery, including the Gog Magog Hills and River Cam Valley.

Initial work on the Cambridge Nature Network is being progressed by CPPF and Wildlife Trust BCN (Beds, Cambs and Northants). 

James based his talk on the recently published interim report of the CNN, which you can read here.

URGENT: Computer recycling: take by Friday 19 March

 

Readers of our Winter newsletter will know that Shelford resident Mike Nettleton (*protected email*) collects unwanted computer hardware to be recycled for public benefit.  Here is his latest news:

Computer recycling Friday 19 March. We’ve arranged for unwanted computer hardware (PCs, laptops, printers, monitors, etc.) to be collected for recycling on 19 March. We can also now take mobile phones again. Recycling is done by Recycle-Computers, based in Watford. They refurbish PCs, monitors, printers, etc. and then give the hardware to schools, charities, etc. which don’t need/can’t afford new equipment. Anything which can’t be used is WEEE recycled. They have been recycling in the area since the early 2000s, initially as a result of an initiative by the former vicar of Great Shelford, Mike Goater. Please dig out any computer hardware that you no longer need and/or is broken and either drop it round to me or give me a ring (07905 356468).

Just as a reminder – we also recycle printer cartridges and mobile phones. Where they have economic value, they are recycled through Recycle4Charity, who then make a contribution to Tommy’s (the premature birth charity): http://www.tommys.org Where the cartridges have no economic value, they are recycled through the manufacturers own recycling scheme. Again, please just drop any old cartridges round.

Over the last couple of months we’ve had a major push (with the Great Shelford Parochial Charities and COVID support group) to provide laptops to children for home schooling. We had over 60 laptops donated; something like 30% of those have been usable and have been donated to local schools and individual children. Those which are too old, broken or whatever will be properly recycled, so nothing goes to landfill. Every machine (whether usable or not) has been wiped and those which are usable have been upgraded to the latest version of Windows and had office and video/music software installed at no cost to the schools or individual children.

What a wonderful initiative – please support Mike if you can.

Upcoming dates 2021

For your diaries, our proposed dates for 2021 are these, with a mixture of planning meetings and events or activities. It’s likely that all will be virtual for a while, of course. Check our Facebook page for information nearer the time.

Monday 8th February

Thursday 11th March

Thursday 8th April

Monday 10th May

Monday 7th June

Thursday 8th July

Thursday 12th August

Monday 6th September

Monday 11th October

Thursday 4th November

Thursday 2nd December (Annual Open Meeting)

Events we hope to arrange this year include finding out about local water supply, the Local Plan, holding a litter pick and running a fruit and veg swap on weekend dates, and arranging something around the COP26 in November (the international environmental conference that the UK is hosting in Glasgow). Various other ideas were discussed in our planning, so watch this space. We may also add in repair cafes or outdoor events when it is safe to do so.

The supply of water will be a limiting factor in the development of this area. It is discussed in the draft Greater Cambridge Local Plan. Our aquifers suffer from over-extraction for agriculture and to supply all the houses in the area, and it is important that we protect the quality of our chalk streams. There is a newly-formed group, Friends of the River Cam, and they have a very good video on YouTube called Saving the River Cam, by Feargal Sharkey.

We hope to arrange a date for the collection of old computer equipment for re-use or recycling, through a local contact. So don’t throw out your old laptops and cables, they can be useful to others  – not least the children who are having to stay at home during the pandemic but haven’t the means to study online.

A few things to do while you’re locked in again:

Try and shop locally rather than swelling the supermarket coffers if you can. You’ll save petrol, packaging, and keep local shops going.

At some date in February our MP’s next Environmental Forum is to be held, so if you are interested in attending do keep an eye on his website (anthonybrowne.org) or his Facebook page so you can register.  If you have a question you can ask it at the Forum or submit it in advance.  It is helpful to us if you can also send a copy to us at the usual address (moc.l1620743376iamg@1620743376ssssp1620743376uorgn1620743376eerg1620743376 )

You may have seen that Chris Packham has launched a petition to stop HS2 (HS2 petition will find it on Google). The case for it is weakened as more people will continue to work from home longer-term, at least some days a week (same as for the Busway closer to home…). If you want more information about the damage to nature before you sign, see the Woodland Trust’s website.

If you are interested in green matters and the environment, send an email to moc.l1620743376iamg@1620743376ssssp1620743376uorgn1620743376eerg1620743376 to sign up for our newsletter, ask a question,  or to join in any of our meetings. Also see our Facebook page.

Helen Hale

Annual Open Meeting 7 December 2020 – report

2G3S Annual Open Meeting 7 December 2020 – by Zoom

16 people present, with 4 apologies.  Claire Lord chaired.

Review of 2020

2 Conversation Evenings in person (Natural Disasters; Eco-friendly gardening); 3 by Zoom (Cook stoves in Africa; Extinction Rebellion; Sustainable Diet).  Better attendance in person, although the Zoom meetings still averaged around 15 people.

1 Repair Café, in Great Shelford at the end of February.  Held jointly with GS Free Church who ran a Swish (high-quality clothes swap) at the same time.  Very successful with nearly 70 items seen and 12 repairers present – over 50% items repaired.

Other Events: Open Eco home; guided nature walks; fruit and veg swap; ‘The Story of Plastic’ online film show and discussion.

Campaigns: SE Busway proposals; Greater Cambridge Green Infrastructure survey.  Traffic surveys in Great Shelford.  Involvement with 4 local bids to South Cambridgeshire’s Zero Carbon grant scheme, all successful.  Major representation at MP Anthony Browne’s Zoom calls as part of The Time Is Now campaign and subsequently.

Plans for 2021

Agreed to meet every month and alternate planning meetings with events; probably all on Mondays or Thursdays.

Conversation Evenings: It was thought that we should ensure conversation evenings include what actions we can take locally in our community or as individuals, and pick events that will be attractive more widely in the community.

Agreement of themes: Water, local planning issues and possibly some of the strands in the government’s 10-point plan on climate change, eg green public transport, cycling and walking; greener buildings; protecting our natural environment.

Other events considered: cycle rides; nature walks; another Wandlebury event; virtual Repair Café (like Gardeners’ Question Time?)

Roles

Convenor: Claire Lord

Co-chairs: Sophi Berridge, Peter Fane

Treasurer: Chris Cooper

Meeting notes: Jane Chisholm, Helen Hale

Publicity: Beth Atkin (social media), Helen Hale (village magazines), Linda Whitebread (newsletter and website)

Repair Cafés: Chris Cooper, Yasmin Emerson

Greener Sawston rep: Yasmin Emerson

You can contact any of us at moc.l1620743376iamg@1620743376ssssp1620743376uorgn1620743376eerg1620743376 – say who the email is for and it will be forwarded.

Circular Economy: latest developments

Hurrah! – the European Parliament has just voted to support the Right to Repair – more here.

Closer to home, the House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee report ‘Electronic Waste and the Circular Economy’ came out last week; see the full report here.  It turns out the UK produces the world’s second highest amount of e-waste per person……

But a positive outcome is the committee’s 27 recommendations including enshrining the right to repair in law; enforcing access to repair manuals and access to affordable spare parts; and the ability to repair products without needing access to physical or software tools specifically designed to be a barrier to independent servicing or repair.  (Of course, there is a way to go before these recommendations, if accepted, become law.)
 
Tom Bragg of Cambridgeshire Repair Cafes has done a fantastic job in pulling out the most salient points:
  • the UK generates the second highest amount of E-waste per person in the world (23.9 kg/person/y), after Norway (26kg). 
  • the average European household has 44 electronic or electrical items at home plus another 45 lamps or light fittings
  • Natural resource extraction and processing makes up approximately 50 per cent of the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced worldwide [I assume this includes mining, transport, manufacture, etc]
  • Though the UK collects most of its electronic waste at Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs)137 it is also the European country with the least HWRCs per inhabitant and one of lowest per 1000 km2 – mostly out of town and only accessible by car.
  • extending the lifetime of all washing machines, smartphones, laptops and vacuum cleaners in the EU by one year would lead to annual savings of around four million tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2030, which is equivalent to taking over two million cars off the roads for a year
  • average lifetime of a washing machine fell from an average life of 10 years to seven years between 2000 and 2010
  • large household appliances being replaced within the first five years of their service life due to a defect increased from 3.5 per cent in 2004 to 8.3 per cent in 2013
  • for fridges, the UK had the lowest average replacement age (5.1 years)
  • In 2013, the average smartphone lifetimes in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK were around 18.3 months, rising to 21.6 months in 2016, potentially due to the decreasing rate of innovation
  • 65 per cent of people feel frustrated about how long products last, and 62 per cent at the difficulty of repair. 75 per cent said that Government should ensure businesses produce repairable and recyclable products
  • 40 per cent of Smartphones running the Android operating system are no longer receiving security updates.  iPhones, up to iPhone 6 released in 2015, are now considered obsolete
  • Restart Project has estimated that over 1,000 community repair events logged in its online system have saved an estimated 17,864 kg of electronic waste and an estimated 280,894 kg CO2 emissions
  • Smash the display on Apple’s iPhone 11 Pro Max, for example, and you can expect to pay £326 to get it fixed by the tech giant if it’s out of warranty. If the damage sustained by the iPhone comes under ‘other damage’ (faults not related to the display), that number could rise to a whopping £596.44
  • 1,714,000 tonnes of EEE (Electrical and Electronic Equipment) were purchased in the UK in 2019.  505,445 tonnes WEEE (Waste EEE) were collected, down from a peak of 589,850 tonnes in 2016
  • 155,000 tonnes were thrown away in domestic bins and incinerated or landfilled in 2017
  • 190,000 tonnes, equivalent to 527 million small old unused electronical items, are hoarded by UK Households (av 20 /household)
  • 140 million cables are held in people’s homes across the UK, enough to go around the earth 5 times
  • 2.5% – 10% estimated amount of electronics that are re-used by others

The Committee’s recommendations most relevant to Repair Cafés are:

10.   We support this proposal and urge the Government to bring this forward with the aim of removing electronics with unduly short lives from the market. The expected lifetime label must be linked to the minimum lifespan guarantee. Particular attention must be paid to where the burden of proof lies between consumers and producers.  (Paragraph 94)

11.   The Government must enshrine the right to repair in law, enforcing access to (1) repair manuals; (2) access to affordable spare parts for products; and (3) ability to repair products without repairers needing access to physical or software tools specifically designed to be a barrier to independent servicing or repair. (Paragraph 109)

12.   Technology companies, repair organisations and the UK Government should collaborate to ensure safety is ensured during the repair of electronics. This could be through creating professional standards, that will in turn drive more consumer trust. This collaboration should also look at the protection of intellectual property. (Paragraph 110)

13.   The Government should mandate that products be labelled with a repairability score, based on the products design, the availability and cost of spare parts, access and ease of use of repair manuals. This will incentivise companies to go beyond the minimum requirements already established. Companies with better repairability scores should be rewarded with a reduction in modulated fees for their extended producer responsibility scheme contributions. (Paragraph 111)

14.   The UK Government should encourage repairability through reducing VAT charged on the repair of electrical and electronic products. (Paragraph 112)

Thanks to Cambridgeshire Repair Cafes for this report.

Sustainable Dietary Choices

In a talk on 23 November, Duncan Catchpole* ran through his ‘Top 10’ food sustainability considerations:

  • Try to eat less meat and dairy. Not just for animal welfare and carbon emissions: animals are fed more food than they produce for human consumption, so inefficient.  Growing animal feed is also a major cause of deforestation.
  • Minimise food waste: food waste alone causes 10% of greenhouse gases. Needing to feed the growing world population is seen as a justification for more intensive food production – but we should have enough anyway: a third of food currently produced is wasted (not just by consumers – there is systemic waste in food chains).
  • Look out for sustainable production methods: eg organic, biodynamic, permaculture – these help look after the long-term quality of our soil.
  • Healthy eating: ‘5 a Day’ still a good maxim, both for your health and resulting impact on resources such as NHS. And is your diet sustainable in 3 main ways: environmentally, socially and economically?
  • Consider food miles: energy, emissions, refrigeration costs.
  • Avoid highly processed food: commodification of food leading to lower production standards, long supply chains, reduction in nutritional value.
  • Avoid big corporates: their motive is profit, not keeping people fed and healthy. They push out small, local providers.
  • Seasonal food: eat what is available each season.
  • Sustainable Fish: 85% of global fish stocks now depleted. Look for Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) endorsement .
  • Packaging: try to buy food with minimum packaging, or where you can, refill containers. (Green Weigh just opened in Sawston; also Organic Health in Hauxton; Full Circle and Arjuna shops in Cambridge; and of course the various local organic veg box companies, including Duncan’s own: Cambridge Organic.  See below for details).

Notes

*Duncan Catchpole is the founder and owner of Cambridge Organic (formerly Cambridge Organic Food Company, or COFCO) and has over twenty years’ experience in the sustainable food and drink sector.  He is a founding committee member of Cambridge Sustainable Food and since its inception has been leading CSF’s headline project of creating a Sustainable Food Hub for Cambridge – a local network of food growers, producers, and consumers.

Address/contact details of local no-waste shops as at November 2020  Contact the shops to see what online / delivery / click and collect facilities are currently available.

Green Weigh 60 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3BG  tel 01223 971240  (Website pending: www.greenweighshop.co.uk)  Open Tue – Fri 9 – 5, Sat 9 – 2.30.

Organic Health: 87 Church Rd, Hauxton, Cambridge CB22 5HS  tel 01223 870101  No website or email.  Current opening times: Fri 1 – 5, Sat 9.30 – 12 and 1 – 5

Arjuna Wholefoods 12 Mill Road Cambridge CB1 2AD  tel 01223 364745   Open Mon – Sat 9.30 – 6.00.

Full Circle: 9 Norfolk Street Cambridge CB1 2LD  tel 01223 353158   Open Tues – Sat 10 – 5; Sunday 10 – 4.

Cambridge Organic  (Formerly Cambridge Organic Food Company) box delivery service tel: 01223 873300

 

Repair Cafes – what’s happening?

Because of the pandemic, there  have been no face-to-face Repair Cafes since March.

Circular Cambridge, who co-ordinate our local Repair Cafes, are unfortunately not anticipating face-to-face Cafes returning before 2021.  However, possible developments in the meantime include repair tutorials on YouTube, and online public-facing skill-sharing sessions.  Excitingly, they are also forging links with the community workshop Makespace, in Mill Lane, Cambridge, which has space and equipment where repairs could potentially be carried out.

For a record of a conversation (3 November) introducing Repair Cafe people to Makespace and a virtual tour of Makespace facilities, click here.  For a response from local repairers and a description of the Repair Cafe process from a repairer point of view (10 November), click here.

Meanwhile, 2G3S is seeking  a person or persons to help organise future Repair Cafes more locally – if you might be interested in being part of the team contact us at moc.l1620743376iamg@1620743376ssssp1620743376uorgn1620743376eerg1620743376, or join us at the AOM on 7 December.

For up-to-date information on Repair Cafe developments in Cambridgeshire go to the Circular Cambridge Repair Cafe page and follow the links.